Manual Fadeout (And Carillians for the Machine Book 1)

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We've heard about the farms and of course we know about the harvest camp. We know a tiny bit about how the Tirean lives, but I just have this pressing urge to know more! This review has also been posted at my blog Aug 28, Jennifer Ricketts Donnie Darko Girl rated it liked it Shelves: received-for-review-from-author , young-adult , dystopian.

I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review through the Lovers of Paranormal Group Goodreads. You can find more of my reviews at my blog, Donnie Darko Girl. Just reading the words "human farm" in the synopsis of Fadeout makes me shiver, but that's exactly what the Cartiam is - the place where Silas and his older sister Malina are forced to live from the time they are eight years old until their memories are harvested.

The Cartiam's environment becomes even more unsettled wh I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review through the Lovers of Paranormal Group Goodreads. The Cartiam's environment becomes even more unsettled when the owner and his son, Jamar, arrive. I wanted to love this book after reading its synopsis, but a few issues I had with the story kept me from fully embracing it.

One of those issues was the main character Silas himself. He had zero personality and fell flat for me. I liked him enough to want him to be able to escape with his sister but didn't like him as much as I wanted to. I understood he had to keep his emotions bottled up or risk his memories being harvested, but I needed a way to connect with him somehow. I wanted to see him struggling more with indignation, passion, and rage stirring inside of him. All of those are emotions anyone would feel being trapped in a place like the Cartiam and being treated as less than human.

Had the reader been let in on a secret emotional storm gathering in him while leaving him stoic on the outside, not only would the story still have worked, but I would have been able to care more about him and cheer him on with his plans for escaping. Jamar, the son of the owner, is rich and spoiled with no idea what life is really like for the kids who are trapped in the Cartiam. He's ignorant about the world he lives in, which I couldn't completely blame him for that because it's how he was raised.

He's brainwashed into thinking he's doing society a service. With that in mind, I did feel bad for him because he strives so hard for his father's approval but nothing he does ever seems good enough. His mother is even less emotionally available - she doesn't care he's gone all the time traveling with his father. When Jamar chooses Silas for company, I felt like he was picking out a new toy rather than a human being. I felt less sympathy for him when he felt superior to Silas. Of course he's going to know things Silas doesn't - Silas isn't allowed to have fun or learn to defend himself.

What I didn't understand about Jamar is that once he gets to know Silas, he realizes he's brave and intelligent, which goes against what he's been taught about Silas's social class, yet he still looks down on the other members of Silas's social class. He views them as less than human and unworthy of anything except having memories to harvest, which makes him a hypocrite to me. Doesn't he wonder if he's wrong about the rest of the class, too? Briefly a Radiation Age is mentioned.


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Why was there a Radiation Age? How did it start? How did it end? I'd like to have found out more about that. Fadeout brought out sadness in me, and I felt the cloud of hopelessness and despair surrounding the kids growing up in the Cartiam. They were left to wonder when their memories would be stripped away - the parts of them that makes them who they are.

Fadeout will make you think about the human condition, the way we humans treat each other, the memories and emotions we possess that make each of us unique, and the methods used to control people. With the way Fadeout ends, I want to know what happens next. I need to know what happens next.

Aug 26, Ela rated it liked it Shelves: read-and-review , e-books. I finished this book yesterday afternoon and have been stewing about it and trying to figure out what I want to say about it. And quite honestly, what I feel about it. I'll do my best to group my thoughts.

On the whole, I enjoyed this book. I enjoyed the interactions between Silas and Jamar. The descriptions in the book were quite well done and I could really see what the characters were seeing. The world building was another thing that was quite good, although I do wish that the So The world building was another thing that was quite good, although I do wish that there was a bit more on that front. I really liked the originality of the premise of the book and the creativity involved. I did find the book quite slow at first and I was getting a little frustrated. Although, or maybe because of, the fact that this book is very short only about pages nothing was really going on in the beginning.

I understand the need to introduce the characters and the setting but it was just slower paced then I'm used to. I got sucked it around page 80 when the action and the mind games started. And when I say sucked in, I mean can't-stop-turning-the-pages-oh-no-what's-going-to-happen-next sucked in. I really want to applaud the author on this as I was completely shocked when view spoiler [ Lamuel had the whole riot and Silas and Malina's escape planned out.

The ending was Silas and Jamar went from view spoiler [ best friends to sworn enemies in the span of three sentences? It was just so abrupt and hollow to me. I would understand if they had a huge falling out or something but view spoiler [ the only thing that happened was their emotions were running high and they said things they didn't mean.

Silas hurt Jamar's feelings when he said he couldn't trust him because he didn't save Malina like he promised. While Jamar did all he could to help and got slapped in the face and stabbed in the back figuratively. But Silas was being unreasonable, and so was Jamar and now they're sworn enemies for life? As for the editing, it left something to be desired.

I usually tend to leave that stuff to myself. I know no book is perfect. But if after reading a sentence three times I find myself not understanding what the author is trying to say, or wondering if maybe it's a different dialect they're using or maybe the author is British and I'm feeling like I'm losing my mind, then I think it's a fair statement that the editing could have been stepped up.

The abruptness of the errors ripped me out of the story I was engulfed in and it was hard to get back there. I hope my review doesn't turn anyone away from the book because I really do think it's a wonderful story and has some great points to make about society and the way we as people, even today, interact with each other. Although I was a little disappointed by the ending and was frustrated with the editing, I will be finishing the series.


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  6. The Machine awaits! May 08, Stacey rated it really liked it Shelves: arr-s. I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review: I have to say, was a little nervous when I opened up the book and saw it was a little over pages. But I have to say it was one of those books that had me wanting to keep going and keep reading from page one all the way to the end. It was pages of awesome story and I never felt like the book dragged on just to fill up pages. You begin with a bunch of children in a room being forced to watch another teen being strapped to a ta I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review: I have to say, was a little nervous when I opened up the book and saw it was a little over pages.

    You begin with a bunch of children in a room being forced to watch another teen being strapped to a table while screaming and having something removed from his mind with small glass balls, and one child who is forced to watch doesnt show much reaction at all They are either send to farms to breed and have their children taken away at age 8 or are sent to the machine when they are ready, which extracts all their memories or e-mems and sold for resources.

    It is not like anything I have ever read. You meet the owner and his son, Jamar, he comes across as the spoiled kid who truly believes he is better than everyone as he is at the top of his social class, he is a Tirean, and Cars are the lowest there is. Basically not even seen as human. Jamar is bored and tired of always being taken advantage of and he wants a playmate to boss around and show how great he is and he hand picks Silas, who has been busy trying to plan an escape with his sister.

    Silas and Jamar develop a strange friendship, one that should not be forged because of social classes and Jamar butts heads with his father. I only gave the book 4 out of the 5 stars, as I REALLY wanted to give it 5, but I felt there was some info missing or stories just dropped along the way. I was really quite curious as to how the e-mems were actually used, there is a scene where Jamar puts a file that is Silas's cell mate in line for the machine in order to try and help Silas.

    I seemed like a significant thing to happen and then it was never visited again. I would love to know what happened to Marcus, however I guess with the way things ended maybe we will hear about him in the next book. Jamar also grabbed some missing journal pages and began to read them and then was interrupted at some pivotal information and he took the pages to read later, however it wasnt brought up again in the book.

    I would love to know what was on those missing pages. There were quite a few typos in this book, and a couple of places where there were incorrect words used, however it wasnt horrible or in any way bothered me enough to want to put this book down. I have to say, I was sad when the book was finished, I was surprised with the ending, and I am really looking forward to this summer when the next installment of this book comes out.

    Thank you Ms. Adams for the opportunty to read this book for review.

    FADE OUT - MAD INSIDE

    I really enjoyed this book immensely and have already recommended to several friends. Aug 09, Minerva rated it really liked it. I would like to thank the author for gifting me this book for honest review, Thanks We are taken to a very different world in this book, After the Radiation Age, people are separated in different classes: Tireans, Faans, Ajaks and Carillians.

    We meet Silas he is a Carillian, the lowest in the classes. Carillian are not even considered people. Silas is a thirteen year old boy living in the Cartiam, a human farm or prison. He and the other kids there have very hard lives, living day to day hoping I would like to thank the author for gifting me this book for honest review, Thanks We are taken to a very different world in this book, After the Radiation Age, people are separated in different classes: Tireans, Faans, Ajaks and Carillians. He and the other kids there have very hard lives, living day to day hoping they are not taken to the machine where their memories are taken away and you are left a empty shell.

    Silas only has is older sister Malina, none of the other kids even know they are related. Malina and Silas decide they some how need to escape before its too late. Then the owner and his son Jamar come to visit and escaping becomes more difficult. Jamar is your typical Tirean, the highest in the classes. Jamar has been brought up thinking hes better than everyone especially the Carillians. But Jamar is lonley and wants someone to train with, he convinces his father to let him pick one Carillian to train and play with, Jamar ends up picking Silas, the other kids are not happy with this.

    Alot of the other kids are tired of their situation and things start to happen, rebellions start. When I first started reading this book, it was hard for me to get into it, but after Jamar showed up things took off from there. I really liked both Jamar and Silas.

    But Jamar was the one who did it for me in this book. I like how he started seeing that Silas wasnt what he thought would be. All he has ever really wanted was to please his father and now he starts to change and wants to help Silas and his sister. Christina Adams did a great job with this book. I also had read the White Lilac and enjoyed that one has well. Thanks again. Sep 08, William Stuart rated it really liked it. Disclaimer: I was given this book in exchange for a fair and honest review.

    Synopsis: Silas is a 13 year old Carillian held in a Cartiam waiting for his emotions to be harvested to provide energy for the planet. As part of a rigid caste society, Carillians are non-entities deemed worthless except for the energy harvested from their minds. Silas wants to escape to protect his sister, who is also held at the Cartiam.

    Together, they plot their escape. Jamar is a member of the Tirean caste, the upper Disclaimer: I was given this book in exchange for a fair and honest review. Jamar is a member of the Tirean caste, the upper crust of society and son of the owner of the Cartiam that holds Silas and his sister Malina.

    Upcoming Events

    Jamar picks Silas to be his plaything and companion to stave off the boredom of staying at the Cartiam with his father. The relationship between Jamar and Silas becomes a central theme to the book. No spoilers, though!

    What I liked: This was an interesting plot concept. Harvesting the emotions of a lower caste to support the rest of society was a chilling and disturbing idea, but the author handled it quite well. I liked the Jamar character, and his journey through the relationship with Silas was very well done. Real life things like bullies, emotional manipulation, and dreams of all types of people were hallmarks of the book.

    There were references to it, but it was never quite explained enough for me. The story flowed a little unevenly and there were a few grammatical errors very few. Lastly, the ending seemed geared more toward a sequel than the conclusion of this story. Overall impression: Despite the things I listed above, I liked this book a lot. Sep 05, Annabel rated it liked it Shelves: dystopian , weird-society , crazy-government , cover-to-cover-challenge It's got a good premise and the quirks of the world it's set in were enough to draw me in.

    I was extremely curious about the world and it's inhabitants. I wanted to know how that society functioned, how they justified their actions to the Carillians, how the Car Farms worked I hope so :D What it didn't do for me was create believable characters. The villains of the story in particular A. A Adults and those named 'Lemuel' or 'Tybas' were not well fleshed out, they were cardboard people wandering around plotting their nefarious versions of 'evilness'.

    It was good to see Jamar question his actions a little, to question the system but the ending of the book which I won't go into detail over but to be safe The direction I thought it was heading in with Jamar and Silas and sunshine and puppies in an apocalyptic revolution went completely pear shaped and ended up in a place I won't mention.. Even Silas was hard to connect to and he was the main character. I felt for him. But my heart didn't bleed for him. Entertaining read.

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    Good enough for me to put the effort into reading her other books and sequels should she put them out! Jun 06, Mlpmom Book Reviewer rated it liked it Shelves: blog-tour , author-request. Anyone who has read any one of Adams' books knows that they are unlike anything else out there. Full of imagination and originality galore.

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    Having said that, this one is no different. Adams takes us into a society ruled by classes, where some races are considered more dominate and powerful over the others. A hierarchy of sorts, where the bottom class are considered nothing more than stock to be used and abused as they see fit for the rest of the worlds energy needs. The story is told through the m Anyone who has read any one of Adams' books knows that they are unlike anything else out there.

    The story is told through the main point of view of Silas lower class and Jamar upper class. These two are sort of thrown together and learn that things aren't always what they seem and not always what they were told to believe about one another and the classes. While this is predominately told in Silas' point of view it was nice to have Jamar's as well. To see how the different classes are raised, treated and revered. We also get different glimpses of the outside world away from the Car. While a lot is explained about the farms and what the boys and girls in the Cars are used for, there really isn't as much world building as I would have liked to see.

    I had many unanswered questions about what was going on and why the world was the way it was, how it cam about and why Silas was different from the other girls and boys with his emotions. Since this is only the first book in a planned series I can only imagine that more will be explained and revealed as the story and characters grow.

    Overall this was a very interesting and entertaining read, it did have its slow moments but by the end of the story it did pick back up again and get more interesting. I can only imagine what Adams has in store for the rest of the series. Sep 01, Denise rated it it was amazing. Fadeout is a striking portrayal of the inherent cruelty of the human caste structure illustrating one class's belief in their superiority over others, as well as the net worth in society of those considered lower in the hierarchy. There has been a great upheaval or apocalyptic event that has left the world divided into races or castes; the lowest on the rung being the Cartiam.

    The Cartiam are bred on farms and at age eight are taken from their family to live at a new "farm" that is more like a p Fadeout is a striking portrayal of the inherent cruelty of the human caste structure illustrating one class's belief in their superiority over others, as well as the net worth in society of those considered lower in the hierarchy.

    The Cartiam are bred on farms and at age eight are taken from their family to live at a new "farm" that is more like a prison where they are chipped and monitored. When they reach an age of emotional maturity, usually prior to age eighteen, they are either sent back to the breeding farm to continue to breed or are given to the machine where all of their emotions are extracted and used to fuel the other castes energy needs. In this book we follow Silas's journey, which is heartbreaking.

    Silas for the most part is emotionally shut down with the only joy in his life his older sister Malina. Concern for her and her safety is the only thing driving him and he is single-minded in his quest to save her. This is not a pretty or fun read, but for me was so compelling that I found I could not put it down. It is well written and clean with wonderfully believable characters and situations. I found I had to know if there was hope in this hopeless societal construction or if the injustices would continue to just be accepted. The ending was well done and is a quasi cliffhanger that leaves an opening for the next installment, which frankly I cannot wait to read.

    I requested this book from the author and received it with a request for my honest review without any compensation whatsoever, other than the joy of reading a new book. Sep 15, Liz rated it really liked it.

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    I read this book while extremely tired, but still I found myself very curious to find out what happened next. The scenario was interesting and something I haven't read yet. I feel fortunate to have signed up to read this book. She was able to reel me in and even surprise me at times. The world Christina J. Adams created was relatively believable, and the characters were interesting. I was easily able to remember the characters and their roles which is always helpful. Silas, a 13 year old boy afraid for his sister, is a level-headed and easy to like character.

    His lack of emotional read from the machine does not correlate with was we as the reader know he is feeling. Other than that, it is nice to view the world through Silas's level and calculating eyes. I am curious to see what he will do next. I will also be curious to see the transformation of Jamar. I was a little confused as to some of his decisions towards the end, but I feel that for the most part I watched him change along the way.

    I can deal with what some reviewers called the 'flat' characters of Lemuel and Tybas, as they seemed to serve their roles as they needed to at the time. I do agree that it would be interesting to see Lemuel developed more in the sequels. The end though somewhat short definitely leaves the reader asking for answers, but, at least in my opinion, it was not a frustrating cliff hanger.

    Overall, I think it was a worthwhile read, and I will probably read the sequel s. Aug 20, Satarupa rated it it was amazing Shelves: read-to-review-books. I got this book from the author, free of cost, in exchange of an honest review from my side! Firstly I would like to thank Christina J. Adams for giving me this opportunity of reading and reviewing this awesome book. I really loved this book, it's just great! The story is unique and really fresh! The writing style is fabulous and the language is enriched which spiced up the story. The blurb goes as follows - Thirteen-year-old Silas fears the day when guards come and remove his memories leaving him a I got this book from the author, free of cost, in exchange of an honest review from my side!

    The blurb goes as follows - Thirteen-year-old Silas fears the day when guards come and remove his memories leaving him an empty shell. I really enjoyed the story and hope that ya all will enjoy it as well, so go grab your copy and enjoy the reading! Since Fatale had taken twice as long as originally planned, they did not want to mislead fans or feel pressure to conclude before they were ready.

    When they were asked for a promotional image for use at Image Expo, Brubaker suggested "a typewriter and some blood and a dead body's hands". Phillips removed the hands and incorporated the blood into the logo. After completing the image, he thought the stark white background would help the book stand out on sales racks and continued to use it for subsequent covers.

    While the central plot is a murder mystery, the initial idea was of a writer with PTSD who cannot write and is instead fronting for his blacklisted best friend. Phillips, who lives in the United Kingdom, sometimes has difficulty accurately portraying modern America and said " Hollywood might as well be sci-fi". Although Phillips has been using digital tools like Cintiq and Manga Studio to create his art since , The Fade Out is his first project completed using them exclusively. The change increased the amount of time needed to create each page by almost 50 percent, but had no effect on colorist Elizabeth Breitweiser.

    Visually, Phillips style remained the same as his previous work, which critic Charley Parked notes for its "strong spotted blacks and bold use of negative space". The page first issue was released in print and digitally on August 20, These variants were commissioned directly by the retailers. A second printing was announced the next day and was released on September 24, , the same day as issue two.

    Brubaker suspects the numbers were higher partly because they had developed a following, and partly because retailers had become more supportive of Image books in general. The second issue also went through a second printing, which was released the same day as issue three. In addition to the regular 22 pages of story, each issue included extra material.

    Because the opening credit page was a two-page splash across the inside front cover and page one, an additional page needed to be inserted to make the story start on the recto side of the page. Brubaker's solution was to use page two as a cast list with short descriptions that updated as the story progressed, which he felt was "old-fashioned and neat". These typically foreshadowed future events or expanded on minor characters. Check out Jessie's posts every other Friday.

    Goodreads: Good Reads, Christina J. Elysia has written four manuscripts, and is presently working on editing her fifth book to prepare it for publishing. Reading is one of her favorite things to do, and she finds it impossible to go to a book store without picking up a few new titles. One of her short stories won first place in Writers Weekly 's world-wide writing contest. She dreams of her students looking forward to English Class instead of dreading it, and nights spent working on her writing.